How to drive traffic from pinterest

In this post, you will not only learn how to drive traffic from Pinterest to your blog with these new 2019 techniques, but you’ll also learn what not to do. Here is why:

  • Pinterest is evolving
  • It’s algorithm is changing
  • New features are always being introduced
  • Some features are being removed

The list keeps on growing, but we’re going to focus on the tips and tools that will bring fresh new visitors to your niche blog.

Video: How To Drive Traffic From Pinterest

Here is a simple to follow video guide on how to drive traffic from Pinterest to your niche website.

As you can see, there is a lot that you need to be mindful of. However, there is no need to worry, once you get the hang of it, it becomes almost second nature to create and publish traffic-generating pins into Pinterest.

Tip 1: Pinterest Now Recognizes Hashtags

You read right! Hashtags are finally a source of traffic on Pinterest. Now, you can implement SEO to your pins along with trending hashtags. This is exciting news, here is how to use them.

  • Get the two most popular ones for your niche.
  • When you type them into your pin description, make sure you capitalize the first letter of each word.
  • Your hashtag should never be longer than two words.
  • Never use more than two hashtags per pin description.

If you follow these simple rules then you’ll be on your way to getting more Pinterest traffic.

Remember, this doesn’t replace Pinterest SEO and keyword research, it’s just ANOTHER way to get eyeballs onto your pins.

Tip 2: Use Pinterest SEO & My Free Keyword Tool

The Pin Keyword Finder is a free Google chrome tool I had created to help me quickly and easily gather all the keywords related my niche. You can get this tool right here:

This doesn’t mean you should keyword stuff your pin and board descriptions with a ton of keywords, try to be a bit more selective when using this tool and add keywords to your descriptions that directly relate to your content.

Just to be clear: when it comes to the keywords you’d like to put into your descriptions, it’s best to to lean more towards ‘Quality’ than ‘Quantity’.

Tip 3: Frequency and timing is very important on Pinterest

One thing that you need to do if you want consistent traffic from Pinterest to your blog, is to post a lot of pins.

Not only that, but you need to post them at the peak hours that your traffic is active on Pinterest. That means, you can’t post your pins all at once, you got to post your pins throughout the day.

I used to do it myself but these days I rely on a scheduler to do it for me.  There are many scheduling tools out there but the best one is the Tailwind app. Here is my video review for this tool:

You don’t have to get it to be successful on Pinterest but it sure does help. You can even try the free trial and learn your Pinterest account’s peak hours so that later down the road you can do it yourself.

How to drive traffic from pinterest

Conclusion

You just learned how to drive traffic from Pinterest to your niche content, the next move is yours. All you have to do is apply yourself and be consistent with your efforts and you WILL see results.

It’s important that you start:.

  • Using niche related keywords into your pins.
  • Matching pin publishing times with your audience’s activity.
  • Learning from successful Pinterest pinners.

Follow this guide and come back to it when you need it.  If you have anything to add, or if you feel like I left something out on how to drive traffic from pinterest then let me know in the comments section below.

  • Hello Zain,

    You can find it in the course, it’s inside of the Pinterest traffic ebook.

    Just click the link and it will install on your chrome browser.

    No downloading needed.

  • Hi Ike
    I am a Printly member, how do I get the keyword research tool, please?
    Thanks
    Zain

  • Jason @ TheButlerJournal.com says:

    Wow. I didn’t know Pinterest allowed hashtags now. I have to add them to my strategy.

  • Yup, it’s a new way to connect with your audience.

  • I’m glad I could be of help Norman!